Gibson's Bar & Steakhouse Will Teach You How to Grill

 

Making the perfect steak can be quite a challenge. Trying to cook steak with the right temperature, taste, and appearance that matches everyone’s order to a T can be stressful, frustrating, and seemingly impossible.

Gibsons Bar & Steakhouse, the only restaurant group in the country to have its own USDA Certification, USDA Gibsons Prime Angus, has the top six tips to make succulent steak -- and win appreciative kudos and smiles of approval.

  • It all begins – and ends – with the beef. Gibsons features USDA Gibsons Prime Angus steak. Unmatched for taste and tenderness, it features superior marbling—the fat speckled throughout the meat that gives the steak its great flavor. Marbling is a primary indicator of a steak’s quality.
  • Size Does Matter! All steaks are not equal, thickness is very important. Steaks at least 1” to 1 1/2” thick are best.  The thicker cuts can sear on the outside and still not be overdone inside, while steaks with a thickness under an inch, are likely to dry out on the grill.
  • Check the oil. Before you begin, lightly oil your grilling rack. It keeps the meat from sticking and tearing – and losing its natural juices.
  • It’s got to be hot! Pre-heat the grill to 600-800 degrees and keep it at that temperature for 15 to 20 minutes before putting the steaks on.  It’s during the first few minutes of cooking that the high temperature sears the meat, forming the coating that seals in those tasty juices   In fact, Gibsons executive corporate chefGibsGibsr explains that high direct heat is almost as important as the meat itself.
  • Stick a fork in it? Never!!  Always use tongs or a spatula to turn over a steak when cooking. And resist the temptation to use a fork to test the steak for doneness as it is cooking. A fork will pierce the meat and allow the juices to seep out. Sticking a fork (or a meat thermometer) into a steak is almost like testing an egg by breaking it open while it’s being boiled.
  • One good turn…is enough!  Don’t turn the steak over before at least five minutes of cooking have elapsed on one side. Turning too soon can prevent searing from taking place. The steak should be seared on one side, then turned, seared on the other side and allowed to cook to the preferred doneness.

 

 

News and information presented in this release has not been corroborated by FSR, Food News Media, or Journalistic, Inc.

Add new comment