Two Chefs Pass Certified Master Chef Exam


Two chefs joined the ranks of 66 chefs known as Certified Master Chefs (CMC) following an eight-day exam held at Le Cordon Bleu College of Culinary Arts in Los Angeles, Pasadena, Calif., Oct. 26-Nov. 2.

Currently, there are 68 Certified Master Chefs in the U.S. following the exam. The last exam was held in 2012 at The Culinary Institute of America, Hyde Park, New York, and one chef of seven passed. Candidates for the CMC exam must possess proficiency in a broad range of styles and techniques, and have the ability to perform for eight days under extreme pressure.

The new Certified Master Chefs are:

  • Jonathan Moosmiller, CMC, executive chef, Southern Hills Country Club, Tulsa, Oklahoma
  • Daryl Shular, CMC, director of education and executive chef, Le Cordon Bleu College of Culinary Arts in Atlanta, Tucker, Georgia

“The new Certified Master Chefs have earned what many chefs aspire to their entire career,” says Ken Arnone, CMC and chair of the American Culinary Federation’s CMC/CMPC subcommittee. “In receiving the CMC certification they have shown their proficiency in a broad range of styles, techniques and cuisines through commitment, determination, and hard work.”

10 chefs from across the nation took the eight-day exam. Candidates were tested on healthy cooking, buffet catering, classical cuisine, freestyle cooking, global cuisine, baking and pastry, Continental and Northern Europe cuisines, and market basket.

The chefs had to maintain an average score of 75 out of 100 to pass each segment. Scores are based on kitchen skills, plate presentation, and taste.

“Becoming a Certified Master Chef is a statement of ultimate dedication and skill,” says Thomas Macrina, CEC, CCA, AAC, and ACF national president. “The certification is the culmination of years of practice and perseverance, and I am incredibly proud of these chefs for their accomplishment.”

The Certified Master Chef exam, established in 1981, is considered the highest and most demanding of the ACF’s certification levels.

News and information presented in this release has not been corroborated by FSR, Food News Media, or Journalistic, Inc.

Add new comment